Prevent Raynaud’s Pain, Numbness and Tingling

Author: Brenda Goodman
Date Published: July-2014
Source: Arthritis Foundation

If you’re among the estimated 20 to 30 percent of people with inflammatory arthritis who also have Raynaud’s syndrome, or Raynaud’s phenomenon, a condition that affects blood flow to the extremities and causes pain, numbness and tingling, the fall and spring – months when temperatures are constantly shifting – can be especially challenging. A sudden chill may cause blood vessels to spasm, shutting off circulation and turning affected parts a ghostly shade of white or blue. Fingers, toes, hands, feet, lips and the tongue are most commonly afflicted, and they may become painfully cold, tingling or numb.