Being Disfigured by Scleroderma Gave Me the Chance to Love Myself

Author: Lisa Goodman-Helfand
Date Published: June-2016
Source: Dr. Oz, The Good Life

Nobody escapes adolescence unscarred by the agony of bullies, peer pressure, acne, and hormones. Along with every survivor of that awkward era, I, too, faced these obstacles. But I had the added bonus of navigating a newly diagnosed autoimmune disease: scleroderma.

I was 10 years old when doctors introduced me to the unknown world of scleroderma. It was 1985, long before Google could tell you every horrifying detail about your illness. I had no idea scleroderma could affect a patient externally, causing the skin to tighten and result in disfigurement and other painful physical abnormalities. Nor did I know that in its worst form, scleroderma attacks one's internal organs and can be fatal. In an effort to shield me from the complexities of scleroderma, my mom told me that my skin was tighter than normal, but that I was perfectly fine otherwise.