The primary mission of the Scleroderma Research Foundation is to find, fund and facilitate research that will result in improved therapies and ultimately a cure for patients. To support this mission we strive to bridge the gap between basic and clinical research and clinical practice. 


sclerodermahands-border.jpgThe scleroderma medical community has evolved dramatically over the last two decades; research and earlier diagnosis have improved scleroderma mortality rates and provided treatment options for many of its most serious complications. However, even with this evolution, many patients continue to go undiagnosed for far too long. With the symptoms of scleroderma as diverse as the patients themselves, medical professionals face an often-daunting task. At the Scleroderma Research Foundation, we recognize that physicians are often the first line of defense for people living with this disease.

Furthering the education of healthcare professionals is essential to earlier diagnosis and treatment for scleroderma patients.

This section of the SRF website will continue to grow. It includes articles and other tools that will aid in the understanding of scleroderma's complexities and its related conditions.

To increase understanding of scleroderma, please explore the following sections:

DISCLAIMER: The Scleroderma Research Foundation (SRF) does not provide medical advice, nor does it endorse any drug treatment suggested herein. Information and resources included are for informational purposes only, the SRF does not assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information, product or process disclosed.

 
 

Research News

Pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis: recent insights of molecular and cellular mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities

Author: John Varga, Maria Trojanowska, Masataka Kuwana
Date Published: July-2017
Source: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders

Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a complex disease characterized by early microvascular abnormalities, immune dysregulation and chronic inflammation, and subsequent fibrosis of the skin and internal organs. Excessive fibrosis, distinguishing hallmark of SSc, is the end result of a complex series of interlinked vascular injury and immune activation, and represents a maladaptive repair process. Activated vascular, epithelial, and immune cells generate pro-fibrotic cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, lipid mediators, autoantibodies, and reactive oxygen species. These paracrine and autocrine cues in turn induce activation, differentiation, and survival of mesenchymal cells, ensuing tissue fibrosis through increased collagen synthesis, matrix deposition, tissue rigidity and remodeling, and vascular rarefaction.

The mighty fibroblast and its utility in scleroderma research

Author: Sara M. Garrett, DeAnna Baker Frost, Carol Feghali-Bostwick
Date Published: May-2017
Source: Journal of Scleroderma and Related Disorders

Fibroblasts are the effector cells of fibrosis characteristic of systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma) and other fibrosing conditions. The excess production of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins is the hallmark of fibrosis in different organs, such as skin and lung. Experiments designed to assess the pro-fibrotic capacity of factors, their signaling pathways, and potential inhibitors of their effects that are conducted in fibroblasts have paved the way for planning clinical trials in SSc. As such, fibroblasts have proven to be valuable tools in the search for effective anti-fibrotic therapies for fibrosis. Herein we highlight the characteristics of fibroblasts, their role in the etiology of fibrosis, utility in experimental assays, and contribution to drug development and clinical trials in SSc.This article is available for you to download for free for 1 week until 2nd August 2017.

Systemic Sclerosis Linked With Altered Gut Microbiome

Author: Gregory M. Weiss, MD
Date Published: July-2017
Source: Rheumatology Network

The numbers of Bacteroidetes bacteria in the GI tracts of 2 separate cohorts of patients with systemic sclerosis were significantly reduced when compared with healthy controls. American patients with systemic sclerosis had more extensive alterations in their intestinal microbiota than those in a Norwegian cohort. An abundance of Prevotella species was associated with moderate-to-severe GI symptoms in patients with systemic sclerosis. Clostridium species abundance was associated with low GI symptom severity, and Lactobacillus with none-to-mild constipation.

Biomarkers Predict Digital Vascular Events in Scleroderma

Author: Gregory M. Weiss, MD
Date Published: July-2017
Source: Rheumatology Network

The likelihood of digital vascular pits, ulcers, or gangrene is increased in patients with scleroderma who are double-positive for anti-interferon-inducible protein 16 and anticentromere autoantibodies. Particularly high anti-interferon-inducible protein 16 levels were found in patients with scleroderma who had active ischemic ulcers or gangrene. Measuring anti-interferon-inducible protein 16 levels in patients with scleroderma and anticentromere antibody positivity may help stratify those at high risk for significant digital vascular events.

Mortality risk prediction in scleroderma-related interstitial lung disease: the SADL model

Author: Julie Morisset, MD; Eric Vittinghoff, PhD; Brett M. Elicker, MD; Xiaowen Hu, MD; Stephanie Le, MD; Jay H. Ryu, MD; Kirk D. Jones, MD; Anna Haemel, MD; Jeffrey A. Golden, MD; Francesco Boin, MD; Brett Ley, MD; Paul J. Wolters, MD; Talmadge E. King, Jr., MD; Harold R. Collard, MD FCCP; Joyce S. Lee, MD
Date Published: June-2017
Source: Chest Journal

Rationale Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in scleroderma (Scl). Risk prediction and prognostication in Scl-ILD patients is challenging because of heterogeneity in the disease course.

News for Patients

Systemic Sclerosis Linked With Altered Gut Microbiome

Author: Gregory M. Weiss, MD
Date Published: July-2017
Source: Rheumatology Network

The numbers of Bacteroidetes bacteria in the GI tracts of 2 separate cohorts of patients with systemic sclerosis were significantly reduced when compared with healthy controls. American patients with systemic sclerosis had more extensive alterations in their intestinal microbiota than those in a Norwegian cohort. An abundance of Prevotella species was associated with moderate-to-severe GI symptoms in patients with systemic sclerosis. Clostridium species abundance was associated with low GI symptom severity, and Lactobacillus with none-to-mild constipation.

Biomarkers Predict Digital Vascular Events in Scleroderma

Author: Gregory M. Weiss, MD
Date Published: July-2017
Source: Rheumatology Network

The likelihood of digital vascular pits, ulcers, or gangrene is increased in patients with scleroderma who are double-positive for anti-interferon-inducible protein 16 and anticentromere autoantibodies. Particularly high anti-interferon-inducible protein 16 levels were found in patients with scleroderma who had active ischemic ulcers or gangrene. Measuring anti-interferon-inducible protein 16 levels in patients with scleroderma and anticentromere antibody positivity may help stratify those at high risk for significant digital vascular events.

10 Tips for a Healthy Recovery Following a Lung Transplant

Author: Wendy Henderson
Date Published: June-2017
Source: Scleroderma News

For some chronic lung disease patients, their lung function declines so much that they need to have a lung transplant. However, it’s a complicated procedure and recovery can be slow. To ensure you have the healthiest recovery possible, you’ll need to adhere to a few basic rules, according to the Cleveland Clinic and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. MORE: As the weather turns warmer, many of us will be thinking about vacations and traveling. Here’s some advice for traveling with a lung disease.

Highland Park writer casts light on scleroderma

Author: Karen Berkowitz
Date Published: June-2017
Source: Chicago Tribune

Lisa Goodman-Helfand believes her childhood would have been less emotionally painful had she been told the gravity of her scleroderma diagnosis from the start. When she was 10, a series of tests at a Chicago pediatric hospital confirmed what a dermatologist had suspected. She had scleroderma, a potentially fatal disease of the autoimmune system characterized by a thickening and hardening of the skin.

Galectin’s Candidate Therapy GR-MD-02 Patent Extended to Cover Several Illnesses Including Systemic Sclerosis

Author: Alica Melao
Date Published: June-2017
Source: Scleroderma News

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has granted Galectin Therapeutics a new patent that extends coverage of its candidate therapy GR-MD-02 to treat systemic sclerosis and other diseases in which high levels of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (or iNOS) enzyme causes inflammation. “With this patent extending claims to a wide-range of diseases with an inflammatory response, we now have a broad range of patent coverage both for diseases in which we currently have developmental programs, as well as, potential areas of future investigation,” Dr. Peter G. Traber, Galectin’s CEO and chief medical officer, said in a company press release.