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Treatment outcome in early diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis: the European Scleroderma Observational Study (ESOS)

Author: A. Herrick, X. Pan, S. Peytrignet, M. Lunt, R. Hesselstrand, L. Mouthon, A. Silman, E. Brown, L. Czirják, J. Distler, O. Distler, et al
Date Published: February-2017
Source: Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases

Objectives The rarity of early diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc) makes randomised controlled trials very difficult. We aimed to use an observational approach to compare effectiveness of currently used treatment approaches.

Methods This was a prospective, observational cohort study of early dcSSc (within three years of onset of skin thickening). Clinicians selected one of four protocols for each patient: methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), cyclophosphamide or ‘no immunosuppressant’. Patients were assessed three-monthly for up to 24 months. The primary outcome was the change in modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS). Confounding by indication at baseline was accounted for using inverse probability of treatment (IPT) weights. As a secondary outcome, an IPT-weighted Cox model was used to test for differences in survival.

 

Immunosuppressants Only of ‘Weak’ Benefit to Diffuse Scleroderma Patients, Study Reports

Author: Magdalena Kegel
Date Published: February-2017
Source: Scleroderma News

A large study following patients in the early stages of diffuse cutaneous scleroderma showed that immunosuppressants offered only a negligible benefit for those who took them, compared to those who didn’t. Since immunosuppressants produced numerically larger reductions in skin symptoms, the findings may support patients using such drugs from the onset of their disease. But since differences between treated and untreated patients were not statistically significant, the study may also point to the need for better treatments.

 

Immunosuppressive Therapy Helps Systemic Sclerosis Patients With Lung Disease

Author: Patricia Inacio
Date Published: January-2017
Source: Scleroderma News

Levels of the cytokine CXCl4 in the bloodstream drop sharply in response to immunosuppressive therapy, and are associated with improved lung function in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD), a study shows. The research, “Changes in plasma CXCL4 levels are associated with improvements in lung function in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy for systemic sclerosis-related interstitial lung disease,” was published in the journal Arthritis Research & Therapy.

 

Immunosuppressive Therapy Helps Systemic Sclerosis Patients With Lung Disease

Author: Patricia Inacio
Date Published: January-2017
Source: Scleroderma News

Levels of the cytokine CXCl4 in the bloodstream drop sharply in response to immunosuppressive therapy, and are associated with improved lung function in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD), a study shows. The research, “Changes in plasma CXCL4 levels are associated with improvements in lung function in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy for systemic sclerosis-related interstitial lung disease,” was published in the journal Arthritis Research & Therapy.

 

Poor Awareness and Confusion Hamper Patient Reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions

Author: Walter Alexander
Date Published: January-2017
Source: Rheumatology Network

The main reason that patients fail to report adverse drug reactions is poor awareness of available reporting systems. When patients do report adverse drug reactions, the most common motive is an altruistic wish that others avoid suffering the same adverse drug reactions, according to an analysis of 21 studies conducted under Rania AL Dweik, Ph.D., of the University of Ottawa in Canada.

 

Systematic autoantigen analysis identifies a distinct subtype of scleroderma with coincident cancer

Author: Robert Linda
Date Published: January-2017
Source: Johns Hopkins Rheumatology

A study by Livia Casciola-Rosen, Ph.D. and Aim Shah, M.D. from the Johns Hopkins Division of Rheumatology in collaboration with Steve J. Elledge, Ph.D. and collegues at MIT and Harvard, used cutting-edge technologies to identify a new subgroup of antibodies present in people without classical scleroderma-associated antibodies who develop cancer and scleroderma within a short period of time.

 
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