M10, a caspase cleavage product of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor, interacts with Smad2 and demonstrates antifibrotic properties in vitro and in vivo.

Author: Atanelishvili I, Shirai Y, Akter T, Buckner T, Noguchi A, Silver RM, Bogatkevich G
Date Published: April-2016
Source: Translational Research

Hepatocyte growth factor receptor, also known as cellular mesenchymal-epithelial transition factor (c-MET, MET), is an important antifibrotic molecule that protects various tissues, including lung, from injury and fibrosis. The intracellular cytoplasmic tail of MET contains a caspase-3 recognition motif "DEVD-T" that on cleavage by caspase-3 generates a 10-amino acid peptide, TRPASFWETS, designated as "M10". M10 contains at its N-terminus the uncharged amino acid proline (P) directly after a cationic amino acid arginine (R) which favors the transport of the peptide through membranes. M10, when added to cell culture medium, remains in the cytoplasm and nuclei of cells for up to 24 hours.